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A Knightsbridge Scandal

by Anita Davison

  eBook : Document

Third book in A Flora Maguire Mystery series!   (2017-06-16)

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by TheAvidReader

A Knightsbridge Scandal by Anita Davison is the third book in The Flora Maguire Mystery series.  We are swept back to the Edwardian era (1903) in this novel.  Flora Harrington is visiting her biological father in London.  Flora discovered William Osborne was her birth father only a year ago.  Flora and her maid, Sally are staying with William in his apartment at the Prince Albert Mansions.  The first evening they have dinner and attend the theater.  They return home to find the police in the alley next to the apartment building.  A woman had been killed near The Grenadier (a pub).  The victim turns out to be Evangeline Lange, who was involved in the suffrage movement.  Flora’s curiosity is aroused because she had witnessed a scene between Ms. Lange and a resident of Prince Albert Mansions.  While William is away at work each day (secretary to the foreign office), Flora (along with her outspoken maid, Sally) starts nosing into Ms. Lange’s life.  Flora tries to share her findings with Detective Inspector Maddox, the lead investigator, but he does not appreciate her help (mostly because she is a woman).   Clues lead toward the foreign office and issues abroad.  What was Ms. Lange involved in?  Flora is determined to unveil the killer, but what happens when she finds herself in a sticky situation?

 

A Knightsbridge Scandal is written during one of my favorite eras—The Edwardian.  That is my favorite part of the book.  The author did a wonderful job at portraying the scenery of London, the clothing, conveyances, and people’s attitudes.  I found the pace of the story to be slow (plodding) and the dialogue stilted (awkward).  I wish the author had provided all the background on Flora in this book.  I have not had the opportunity to read the first two books in The Flora Maguire Mystery series (nor will I), and I was missing some details.  I was especially curious as to why Flora’s husband is called Bunny and why Flora was attracted to him (and why would she marry Bunny after meeting his mother).  The missing information did not affect the story or my view of the book.  The novel would have been better without Flora’s husband and mother-in-law (especially her).  If those people were in my life, I would want to escape to London (I probably would never go back home).  The only reason Flora was investigating the crime is curiosity and boredom (I could understand being bored in that time period).  I give A Knightsbridge Scandal 3 out of 5 stars (it was okay).  Flora was not a character I enjoyed.  I like her curiosity, but not her acerbic comments (some of which did not help her relationship with her birth father) or her recklessness.  Detective Inspector Maddox was a pompous, blowhard.   His attitude, unfortunately, was in line with the time period.  Most men would not appreciate a women’s interference (thankfully, some men were more enlightened).  The mystery seemed complicated, but I could identify the killer long before the reveal.  A Knightsbridge Scandal was not the right historical, mystery for me.  




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